A recipe for economic justice

Professor Barry Supple outlines key components of an economically just society and explores degrees of justice and fairness in an economy. He describes three important ingredients for achieving economic justice in society: the provision of education, a well-resourced welfare state and a progressive taxation system.

A redesigned economy

Helen Barnard explains how the causes of poverty interlink with employment, housing and social security, and the need for a redesigned economy.

Birmingham ‘a tale of two cities’

John Cotton, a Labour councillor in Birmingham, tells the story of in-work poverty and his campaign to make the local council introduce the Real Living Wage (RLW). All council staff and 17,000 employees are now paid the RLW and Birmingham has set up a Poverty Truth Commission to listen to those with lived experience of poverty.

Combating clothing poverty

Louise Cooke founded Sharewear Clothing Scheme in 2014 to combat clothing poverty. She tells the story of how and why she created the scheme in Nottingham and her belief in the dignity of choosing what to wear.

Community action during COVID-19

Kiren Shafiq describes being part of Islamic Help in the summer of 2020. The group helped to deliver food and other basic supplies to people of all communities in Birmingham and other cities in the West Midlands in response to panic-buying at the start of the pandemic.

Community solidarity

Professor Nadia Valman tells the story of late nineteenth and early twentieth century strikes for better pay and working conditions in the East End of London. She explores how people from Irish and Jewish communities, in spite of differences, supported each other in solidarity when facing injustice and defending their rights.

Economic Injustice in history

Professor Robert Beckford explains what an economically just society looks like and explores some of the root causes of social and economic justice in Britain today. He also explores the morality of extreme wealth and, in our podcast series, the legacy of colonialism.

Economic justice and employment

Tessa Gray explains the different types of employment in the UK, the need for a living wage on top of a basic minimum wage, and what changes are necessary in order to bring about economic justice. In our podcast series she explores how economic injustice affects refugees and asylum seekers and other historically excluded people.

Economic justice, work and leisure

Tania Aubeelack explores the links between the value of work, leisure, and the gig economy. In our podcast series, she explains that an economically just society gives everyone a fair share and equal access to knowledge, happiness, health, freedom, and prosperity.

Equity of health and well-being

Professor Sir Michael Marmot explains that social inequality is about more than just economic inequality, it is also about being able to live a dignified healthy life. Equity of health and well-being, as well as income, can all ensure people are able to participate fully in society.