A recipe for economic justice

Professor Barry Supple outlines key components of an economically just society and explores degrees of justice and fairness in an economy. He describes three important ingredients for achieving economic justice in society: the provision of education, a well-resourced welfare state and a progressive taxation system.

A redesigned economy

Helen Barnard explains how the causes of poverty interlink with employment, housing and social security, and the need for a redesigned economy.

Economic Injustice in history

Professor Robert Beckford explains what an economically just society looks like and explores some of the root causes of social and economic justice in Britain today. He also explores the morality of extreme wealth and, in our podcast series, the legacy of colonialism.

Economic justice and employment

Tessa Gray explains the different types of employment in the UK, the need for a living wage on top of a basic minimum wage, and what changes are necessary in order to bring about economic justice. In our podcast series she explores how economic injustice affects refugees and asylum seekers and other historically excluded people.

Economic justice, work and leisure

Tania Aubeelack explores the links between the value of work, leisure, and the gig economy. In our podcast series, she explains that an economically just society gives everyone a fair share and equal access to knowledge, happiness, health, freedom, and prosperity.

Equity of health and well-being

Professor Sir Michael Marmot explains that social inequality is about more than just economic inequality, it is also about being able to live a dignified healthy life. Equity of health and well-being, as well as income, can all ensure people are able to participate fully in society.

Legacy of Empire

Professor Gurminder Bhambra explains the extent of wealth extraction from former British colonies to fund British institutions and the idea that an economically just world is about human value and fair distribution.

Structural economic injustice

Dr. Charlotte MacPherson explains the power of rhetoric that blames people for their own poverty and structural injustices. She focuses on the links between low wages, insecure work and food poverty experienced by young people. In our podcast series, she explores what an economically just society looks like.