Arts activism and community participation

Chris Chalkley talks about art and activism as a tactic and the People’s Republic of Stokescroft, which provides spaces for artists in Bristol to create public artworks and share their work, engaging with community around a range of social and political issues.

A redesigned economy

Helen Barnard explains how the causes of poverty interlink with employment, housing and social security, and the need for a redesigned economy.

Disability and sports

Sandra Hulme, Mark Palmer and Peter Wyman tell the story of the founding of Greenbank College by Gerry Kinsella MBE, elite athlete, GB medal-winner in the World championships for wheelchair basketball. The College offers education, training, employment, sport and recreational activities for disabled and other disadvantaged local people in Liverpool as a form of economic justice.

Theatre, class and economic injustice

Luke Aaron tells his story, coming from a rural working class area in the Forest of Dean, experiencing a lack of access to jobs, housing support and opportunities. Now, as a drama student in London, Luke’s experiences inform his work – he uses theatre as a means to give voice to those facing economic injustice.

Living Song CIC

Jane Wheeler tells the story of founding Living Song CIC, rooted in Newham, East London, and centred around singing. By providing opportunities for young people from diverse backgrounds to develop a sense of self and connections with each other, Living Song builds community through the belief that singing is for all and helps people unite, with their differences.

Community action during COVID-19

Kiren Shafiq describes being part of Islamic Help in the summer of 2020. The group helped to deliver food and other basic supplies to people of all communities in Birmingham and other cities in the West Midlands in response to panic-buying at the start of the pandemic.

Friends of the 65 Bus

Rosemary and Brian tell the story of a group campaigning to save the 65 Bus route in Monmouthshire. They lobbied councillors and MPs, started a petition and encouraged support by talking to the community about rural isolation and climate change. Today, the bus remains vital for those who are isolated or vulnerable, and is now popular with other residents and visitors.