A recipe for economic justice

Professor Barry Supple outlines key components of an economically just society and explores degrees of justice and fairness in an economy. He describes three important ingredients for achieving economic justice in society: the provision of education, a well-resourced welfare state and a progressive taxation system.

Community solidarity

Professor Nadia Valman tells the story of late nineteenth and early twentieth century strikes for better pay and working conditions in the East End of London. She explores how people from Irish and Jewish communities, in spite of differences, supported each other in solidarity when facing injustice and defending their rights.

Craigielea Care Home Dispute

Keith Hodgson tells the story of Craigielea Care Home in the North East of England, UK. After blowing the whistle on the poor treatment of residents and going on strike, some care home staff were sacked. Keith helped create a high profile campaign using music and performance to raise awareness and the staff successfully found new jobs in their local area.

Economic Injustice in history

Professor Robert Beckford explains what an economically just society looks like and explores some of the root causes of social and economic justice in Britain today. He also explores the morality of extreme wealth and, in our podcast series, the legacy of colonialism.

Economic justice, work and leisure

Tania Aubeelack explores the links between the value of work, leisure, and the gig economy. In our podcast series, she explains that an economically just society gives everyone a fair share and equal access to knowledge, happiness, health, freedom, and prosperity.

Intergenerational legacy

Sonya Hundal tells the story of her parents who were members of the Indian Workers Association, known for its campaigns to protect the rights of early immigrant workers in the 1950s and 1960s. Sonya talks about how many migrants overcame tremendous hardships and how strong the trade union movement made them.

Legacy of Empire

Professor Gurminder Bhambra explains the extent of wealth extraction from former British colonies to fund British institutions and the idea that an economically just world is about human value and fair distribution.

Photography as a creative tactic

In his photo essay, Dr Caesar describes his extensive photography and artwork – its aims and range. He talks about significant influences and the impact of his most powerful projects documenting prominent figures and historical events such as the 1985 Handsworth Riots, all illustrated with a carefully curated selection of his stunning documentary photographs.